Erika Childers 20 min

How MEDDIC Can Be Your Common Language for Cloud GTM


MEDDICC is a Sales Qualification Framework that some of the world's most successful sales teams use to drive efficient and predictable growth. In this session, Andy Whyte, CEO of MEDDICC.com, will explain how MEDDIC can connect your entire GTM team as a common language and be the framework that connects the entire customer lifecycle.



0:00

I think we are live. Let's get rock and rolling. Share my screen here. We are

0:10

live. Hello,

0:12

Cloud GTM XP audience. It's awesome to be here. Thank you so much for your time

0:16

and attention

0:16

today. I'm going to get stuck straight in here because I know that we've got a

0:21

packed

0:22

agenda, not just for me, but lots and lots of people to get through. So I want

0:25

to get

0:25

rock and roll. We've got about 19 minutes to get through. And what I want to

0:28

talk about

0:29

today is how you can use medic, med pick as a common language for your entire

0:33

go-to-market

0:34

team. The way I'm going to do this is breaking into three parts. If I can get

0:37

the clicker

0:38

to work, there we go. The first is what is medic. The second is the importance

0:43

of having

0:44

a common language. And the third part is medic for channel. I know so much of

0:48

the audience

0:48

today works in the channel has that crossover of go-to-market. So I want to

0:52

like bring some

0:53

value in that regard as well. My goal for the next 19 minutes is to give you as

0:56

much information

0:57

as to why you need a common language and why you should use med pick for it.

1:02

Now, before

1:03

we start, you might already be thinking, is it like medic of one C, medic with

1:07

two Cs?

1:08

Is it med pick? You might be thinking like, what? I mean, I live this every day

1:13

so I can

1:14

relate if you're feeling a little bit like that. This is how we look at it.

1:17

This is not

1:17

definitive. This is just how we think about it. We think about medic with the

1:21

one C. That

1:22

is the thing. That's the ecosystem. That's talking about the whole framework.

1:26

Our company

1:27

is called medic with two Cs. And med pick is the most commonly used version

1:31

with the

1:31

extra P which stands most commonly for paper process. So what is med pick? So,

1:38

well, it's

1:38

a framework. That's the best way of describing it. It's literally reverse

1:42

engineered from

1:43

how customers like to buy from the best organizations in the world. We have

1:49

done a lot of work to

1:50

make it more versatile to expand it. And I'll talk about that in just a moment.

1:53

But this

1:53

is kind of what it is. It's an acronym, right? Things that people often get

1:56

wrong. They think

1:56

it has to be used in some sort of linear order or that every letter has to be

1:59

used in every

2:00

conversation, not at all. It's just a framework that helps go to market

2:03

professionals to focus

2:05

on the things that their customers care about. I'm not going to be able to go

2:08

into depth on

2:10

medic right now, when I think 101, because we've got a lot of go-to-market

2:13

stuff to talk

2:14

about and common language stuff. But if you want more information, there's a

2:17

load of free

2:17

information on our website and on a YouTube channel has a med pick in 10

2:20

minutes video.

2:21

If you're not sure, you can go and find out or take a screenshot of this. Now,

2:25

one thing

2:25

we see, not very common, but it is out there. And given the audience, I thought

2:29

I'd cover

2:29

it, is that people would use the P and medic for partners that we don't think

2:33

you should.

2:34

We're not very precious about this. Don't get me wrong. Some people get very

2:37

animated

2:38

and very upset if you dare to mess with the heritage of medic. We don't. But we

2:42

think

2:43

that you don't need to. And I'm going to talk about a little bit later on. I'll

2:45

talk about

2:45

why that is, but the P for us stands for paper process. Now, one thing that's

2:49

very important

2:50

that we start before we get too far in is something we call naming, which

2:54

stands for

2:54

not all medic is equal. And the reason why I wanted to sort of level set with

2:58

this before

2:58

we get too far in is that I was looking at the audience and, you know, some

3:02

really great

3:02

companies there. And we know from an informal survey that AWS did with our

3:06

partners that

3:07

around sort of 70 to 80% of you use medical ready. But the thing with medic is

3:12

it's kind

3:13

of an open source and people use it differently. There's different levels of

3:15

proficiency and

3:16

that sort of thing. So what I'm going to talk about is how we use it, how we've

3:18

extended

3:19

it, how we've made it more versatile for go to market teams. That doesn't mean

3:22

that if

3:22

you're hearing this and you think, Oh, we use medic, you're going to be able to

3:24

go back

3:25

to your team and them know what you're talking about. So it's kind of like a

3:27

level set that

3:28

it's not me bragging. It's just making sure that I don't set you on the wrong

3:32

path here.

3:32

Because if you took eight professionals in the go to market and said to them,

3:36

Hey, do

3:36

you know what medic is? They would all say yes. I'm pretty sure everyone would

3:40

say yes.

3:41

But if you actually ask what like their proficiency is, it would be everything

3:44

from like googling

3:45

it asking chat GBT. And if you kind of weighed in their proficiency, it's going

3:50

to vary massively,

3:51

right? From like having very, very little proficiency right up to being quite

3:55

effective

3:56

with it. And it's not just around proficiency, right? It's about how you use it

4:00

. Most people

4:02

use medic as a qualification framework. So if you talk about to our peers in

4:06

the ecosystem

4:07

of medic, everyone else calls it a qualification framework. That means that

4:10

they, if you were

4:11

to say it was a methodology that says not methodology, if that says process, if

4:14

it's

4:14

not a process, if you talk to them about a value framework, let's say you're

4:18

going to

4:18

need something else. If you talk about measuring, they're not going to have any

4:22

idea what you're

4:22

talking about. And therefore, it can't be used to go to market teams or across

4:26

the entire

4:26

customer life cycle. Whereas we see it differently. We think it can be used for

4:30

all of these

4:31

things, right? And particularly for all go to market teams and the entire

4:34

customer life

4:35

cycle. And that's really what I'm here to talk to you about today. But just to

4:38

give you

4:39

kind of, I don't want to go into like a, this is certainly not supposed to be

4:41

anything

4:42

like a sales pitch. I just want to give you the context of how we see things.

4:45

So if you

4:45

think about something like a champion, you can see how we see it as more than

4:48

just that

4:49

kind of quite linear binary, like, do I have a champion or not? We're seeing as

4:53

, hey, if

4:54

I do have a champion, or I don't have a champion, how do I build a champion?

4:57

How do I get my

4:57

champion working for me? How do I how and where should I see the champion in

5:01

this process?

5:02

How do I get my champion to understand the value we talk about? How should I

5:05

best engage

5:05

on value? And what's the impact of having a champion or not having a champion?

5:09

And of

5:09

course that, like I said before, goes through the entire go to marketing. Every

5:13

department

5:13

cares about champions from product through to post sales and revops for

5:17

measuring it.

5:18

And they're important at every part of the stage. You don't just need champions

5:22

in the

5:22

sales process and you pre-champions and post-champions. And it's the same with

5:25

all the letters as you

5:26

go through. Now, people get upset at me here. They get really, really angry,

5:29

all the like

5:29

the purists of medic, because it's like you can't do that. They say medic is

5:33

just the

5:33

qualification framework. They're the same kinds of people that say that cell

5:37

phones are just

5:38

making telephone calls, right? It's like the world's moved on. We've managed to

5:42

take something

5:42

that's really cool and make it even better. And it's the so it's either like it

5:46

's, you

5:46

know, the dinosaur saying it's a qualification framework, or because and or can

5:51

be both that

5:51

they've got their own methodology they want to sell. It's their own IP. They

5:54

don't want

5:55

anyone else to kind of step on it, which is fine. Everyone's entitled to have

5:59

their own

5:59

IP, but they want to have that call at their own thing. They don't want to

6:02

expand something

6:02

that people are already using. So you have to have an uncommon language.

6:05

Whereas we think

6:06

you should have a common language, right? A common language that talks to the

6:10

free imperatives

6:12

of customer engagement, which is value stakeholders and process. It doesn't

6:17

matter whether you

6:18

are engaging with a prospective customer or an existing customer, whether you

6:21

're trying

6:21

to work through a co-selling motion with a partner. This is what really matters

6:26

. This

6:26

is what you want to get into to make sure you're having the best conversations

6:31

with your customs,

6:32

what they really care about as well, right? And it kind of breaks down like

6:35

this from

6:35

a med pick perspective. You've got what pain is it that we're solving and what

6:39

value do

6:40

we provide by solving that pain and how does our solution do it? Right? That's

6:44

like the

6:44

first three elements. Then we think about stakeholders. It's like, who's our

6:47

champion?

6:48

No champion, no deal, big champion, big deal. Who is the overall authority the

6:51

economic

6:52

buyer and who are we competing against? Remember, competition isn't just your

6:55

rivals. It's

6:56

other initiatives, projects. It could be doing nothing. In our share is a

7:00

competitor if you

7:01

use med pick correctly. And then there's of course the process. How do we

7:05

engage? How do

7:06

we make sure we engage? How the customer wants us to engage? How do they buy?

7:09

Which is more

7:09

than just paperwork nowadays? Of course, we have the cloud marketplaces and the

7:12

most switched

7:13

on organizations are the ones that are being proactive with that. So they're

7:18

thinking about

7:18

this right at the start of engagements and using it as a differentiator to

7:22

build new

7:23

champions and find that person that really cares about that committed spend and

7:26

all that good

7:27

stuff. This is not new. This is like right message, right person, right time,

7:30

but it's

7:30

the first time that somebody has put a framework together to make it work

7:35

across the go to

7:36

market team. So part one, key takeaways. First things first, medic is an

7:41

acronym, right?

7:43

It's got different letters to it, but generally that's, you know, med pick is

7:45

the most common.

7:48

Not all medic is equal, so proficiency will vary and most people use it for

7:51

qualification

7:52

only. And we see it as a common language across free pillars, value,

7:54

stakeholders and process.

7:56

All right. So the importance of a common language for go to market teams,

8:00

basically, first off,

8:02

why do you need a common language? Well, it's pretty straightforward from my

8:06

perspective.

8:07

We've got this go to market, but it's very, very siloed, right? Every different

8:11

go to market team,

8:13

and this is not, you know, this is not definitive. There's other teams that

8:15

fall in and out of go

8:16

to market, of course. What they really are caring about, what customers care

8:20

about from them

8:21

is understanding, you know, what value is it you provide to which stakeholders

8:24

and when is it right

8:25

to surface that value in the customer life cycle, the customer process, right?

8:30

But if we just talk

8:31

about value alone and we go back to our silos, every single department talks

8:36

about value differently,

8:37

right? Product talks about user stories and jobs to be done, SDRs talk about

8:41

custom stories,

8:41

marketing talks about features benefit. Every department has a different way of

8:45

talking about

8:46

the same thing, which is the value they provide to their customers, the pain

8:48

they solve,

8:49

the value they get from solving that pain and how their solution does it. So if

8:52

you're the customer

8:53

here, right, and you enter in from the website or some traditional manner, and

8:58

you go around a

8:59

cut, you know, a sales cycle to becoming a customer, it's so incohesive, right?

9:04

You're not going to get

9:05

a very strong, clear message. You're kind of having to like translate the

9:09

messages as you go,

9:10

and that's the customer, right? Each go to market team themselves has to try

9:14

and like figure out

9:15

what is they mean for their colleagues and so on and so on. Now, like, value is

9:20

an interesting

9:21

thing, right? How do you define it? Well, we like to define it this way. It's

9:24

basically this. It's

9:26

what pain is it that your solution solves? So what pain is it the customer has,

9:31

and then

9:32

what value do you get from solving that pain, right? So you find the pain and

9:35

you quantify the

9:36

value in solving that, the utopia state after your solution, that is value,

9:39

right? So it's kind of

9:41

like i plus m equals value, implication of pain plus the quantification of

9:44

plane with metrics

9:46

equals value. But that's not that makes it sound so simple, doesn't it? That's

9:51

just the high level

9:52

value. But if we zoom in on stakeholders, every stakeholder feels the same pain

9:58

and the same

9:58

quantification of the value in solving that pain differently. I'll give you an

10:02

example of what I

10:02

mean. I think it's hard in these sessions to pick something that everyone knows

10:06

, but I think we can

10:06

all relate to ransomware, right? The idea of like if somebody takes over your

10:11

company's machines and

10:12

you can't get access. Let's say we, collective audience here, we have a

10:15

solution that 100%

10:17

solves ransomware, and we're selling it like hotcakes in the market, because

10:20

that would be a great

10:21

thing that was 100% proof. But even so, we all know at high level what value we

10:26

get from solving

10:27

ransomware, every single sea level person on this slide has a slightly

10:31

different interpretation

10:32

of value. So we've got like that job of multiple go-to-market teams, multiplied

10:37

by the stakeholders

10:38

who each see the value differently. If we don't have a common language, what

10:40

chance have we got

10:41

to really appealing to how each stakeholder really cares about the value. And

10:45

then you've got the

10:45

process. It's not just like value on, value off. You have to build the value

10:50

through the process,

10:51

and not just through the sales cycle. It has to come pre-sale cycle to capture

10:54

the customer's

10:55

attention and show getting them to think about us differently through to

10:58

winning them,

10:59

through to delivering that value as well. A sales cycle looks like this, right?

11:03

If you've got like

11:03

the horizontal access here, which is the time of the sale, before to the

11:07

closing winning,

11:08

and then the perception of value is the vertical access, right? So the higher

11:11

up the line goes,

11:12

the more pain is being perceived. Now, salespeople think this happens, right?

11:18

This is the mistake

11:19

they make. They think they build value to the point, and then the customer's

11:21

like, "Yes,

11:22

brilliant. Well done. You're amazing, Mr. and Mrs. Salesperson. I want to buy

11:26

it." And they think

11:26

the value stays up there. And this is wrong, right? This does not happen. What

11:30

actually

11:30

happens is this. They build the value to a point. The customer shows some

11:33

interest,

11:34

and then they switch to closing mode, and they typically forget to carry on

11:37

building that value.

11:37

So it falls off and falls away. And hopefully it doesn't fall below that

11:41

inertia line so that

11:42

they still win the deal, but that it slows down. And that's why one of the

11:46

reasons why

11:46

deals can slip is because people lose that enthusiasm. Now, something that bad

11:50

sales people do as well

11:51

as this is they leave things like the cloud marketplace engagement until at the

11:57

end as our

11:57

good friend Phil Sohn at AWS would say they meet the customer at the checkout

12:01

and then talk about

12:02

cloud marketplaces. Not a good move, right? We'll talk about what good sales

12:05

people do in a second.

12:07

But let's just talk about good salespeople as a whole. So what you may think I

12:10

'm going to say

12:10

is it's going to be like this very linear up line, but it's not. It'll go up

12:15

and down because

12:16

all kinds of things that happen. The customer can have other priorities. They

12:20

can have the

12:20

competition that starts to do a good job as you get into closing the paper

12:24

process and those

12:24

things can really slow things down. And so the customer loses that bit of

12:28

perception of value,

12:29

but the good salespeople, they bump it back up. They bump it back up as they go

12:32

as do good go

12:33

to market teams. Now, as I said, good salespeople, they're thinking about the

12:37

cloud marketplace

12:38

engagement right at the start. I know salespeople that are using it as a

12:42

pipeline generation

12:43

method. They're going into big organizations where they know they have a

12:46

committed cloud spend,

12:47

and they're finding that person that cares about that to make intros for them

12:50

for their product,

12:51

smart thinking, right? Now, of course, they follow the cloud marketplace

12:55

throughout the process,

12:56

right? They're keeping it engaged. They probably have some kind of really

12:59

awesome technology

13:00

that can help them do that. I don't know. Maybe you guys might have heard of

13:03

something that I know.

13:04

What's really important now, if we expand this out over the entire customer

13:09

life cycle, so you can

13:10

see we've gone live or business as usual and renewals in place here, we also

13:13

have the danger zone. Now,

13:15

the danger zone is if the customer's perception of the value falls below that,

13:18

you're even not

13:18

going to buy if it's pre-sell, if it's post-sell, they're not going to renew.

13:22

If we put our bad sales

13:23

person line over the top, we can see they might get the deal, but they're

13:25

probably not going to

13:26

renew. The perception's falling down, whereas our good salesperson, they've got

13:30

it above it,

13:31

but up and down, but most importantly, when it mattered, the value was high and

13:35

they're going to

13:35

get the renewal. But it's wrong to say that this is just a salesperson doing a

13:40

good job here.

13:41

This is an effort of the go-to-market team. You can see the departments and

13:45

when they're coming in,

13:46

I know that maybe in your business, there's even more departments. In fact, it

13:49

might be even more

13:50

complicated. I imagine it's even more complicated than this. Lots of different

13:52

departments all

13:53

playing really important roles throughout the sales cycle, but also in that

13:57

perception of value,

13:58

keeping that perception high. If we look at, say, partnerships, and this is a

14:03

work in progress,

14:03

because I couldn't quite get it done in time with all of the great insights I

14:06

was getting from so

14:07

many of my friends that work in the channel, but there's all these different

14:10

things. The point I

14:10

want to make here is if you work in channel, this might resonate with you, but

14:15

every person that's

14:15

in marketing will have the same slide with different things on and an SDI will

14:19

have different things,

14:20

and sales engineers have different things. You're all trying to do the same

14:23

thing, which is provide

14:25

value to the right stakeholders at the right time, but you're all doing

14:29

different ways to do it,

14:30

which is fine, which is like your job, right? You're not supposed to be carbon

14:32

copies of a go-to-market

14:33

teams. But if it looks like this, it's very hard to scale that engagement with

14:38

your customers,

14:39

because it means you're having to translate at every point. Whereas if you had

14:42

a common language,

14:43

everything goes together. Why MedPik for this? Well, before I talk about why

14:47

MedPik have to talk about

14:50

what a go-to-market common language is. First thing first, there's three imper

14:55

atives. The first

14:56

of the imperatives is it must be common. Now, I know what you're thinking. I'm

14:59

glad you probably

15:00

will sat down for that mind-blowing insight you just gave there, Andy. Wow,

15:04

common language has to

15:04

be common. But actually, people get this wrong all the time. I hear over and

15:08

over again of these

15:09

frameworks that no one, I don't see anyone using, but people are saying it's a

15:12

common language.

15:13

So it has to be common. If you look at MedPik, this is back from March, so this

15:16

chart might

15:17

change a little bit, but you get the point. Seven out of the top eight public

15:20

cloud companies in

15:21

terms of their enterprise value in next 12 months, forecasted growth. Seven out

15:26

of eight

15:26

are MedPik companies. I don't know what they do. Good luck to them, though.

15:30

Good luck to them.

15:31

It's like a very closed shop, that's for sure. If you look on LinkedIn and you

15:35

search for jobs,

15:36

they're advertising MedPik. There's 170 mentions. If you combine challenger,

15:40

Millerheim and Sandler, gap selling and Spiced, there's 49. Actually, there's

15:44

36 because gap selling

15:46

is just gap and Spiced is Spiced. So, Chef jobs, basically. If you look here,

15:53

you've got George

15:53

Kurt, CEO, president, founder of Awesome Company CrowdStrike on stage with one

15:58

word behind them,

15:59

MedPik. Phil Sohn from AWS at Partners Summit, AWS Partner Summit here. MedPik,

16:03

it's a common

16:04

language, right? I'm sure I don't need to sell that to you too much. The second

16:08

part here is it

16:09

has to work for every go-to-market team. So, if we think about product here,

16:14

when they think about

16:14

value, they think about what part of the product, what pain does it solve for

16:17

the customer,

16:18

and what value does the customer get from solving it, and how is it that our

16:21

solution does it,

16:21

and then you can think about the stakeholders who care, who's going to be the

16:24

champion for this,

16:25

who's going to be the overall authority. And that carries through for every

16:28

single go-to-market team.

16:29

They have the same language. They define it the same way. So, they use it in

16:33

different ways.

16:34

Obviously, marketing uses it in copy on websites. SDRs use it in outreach.

16:39

Sales people use it in

16:40

demos, and so on in discovery, and so on and so on. But it's the same

16:43

underlying message,

16:44

and for the same stakeholders, and they use it at the right points in the

16:49

customer engagement process.

16:51

The third imperative here is around the customer lifecycle itself. So, it must

16:57

work

16:57

across whole customer lifecycle. So, we're talking about having disparate go-to

17:00

-market teams

17:02

is the first example here. And what I mean by this is they have like,

17:05

features, benefits, the marketing teams, maybe use BAN, and then they use some

17:08

homegrown or,

17:09

you know, off-the-shelf kind of methodology, and then use QBRs. The silo GTM

17:13

similar, but they use

17:15

kind of well-known frameworks, but they use them all, like, in their silos, so

17:18

qualification for BAN,

17:20

MedPIC, just for qualification, a conch-mod of the message, or as sort of value

17:24

-selling or something

17:25

in that section, and then they use QBRs and NPS scores, and then the common

17:30

language goes all

17:31

the way across. So, somehow, when you have three minutes left, so I'm going to

17:34

have to really speed

17:35

up. I thought I was going fast, you know? Anyway, I thought I'd want to run

17:39

over that for sure.

17:41

So, here's the bit I want to leave you with before we wrap up with how you use

17:44

the channel. This is

17:45

how we position how we use MedPIC as a end-to-end value framework. You have the

17:50

M1, which is a

17:52

example of where you've delivered the value before. I'm not going to go into

17:55

too much detail on this.

17:55

You can get in touch with us, you want more information, or if you, it's

17:58

definitely on our

17:59

website, if you just want more information, don't have to buy it from us to get

18:01

this information.

18:02

The idea is an M1 positions the value that you can bring to that customer based

18:07

on a real-life

18:08

example of where you've delivered it before. If that resonates, then you pivot

18:11

to an M2,

18:12

which is where you talk to that customer about how that value, what that would

18:17

mean for them.

18:17

So, you kind of personalize it. And then if you win the deal, you then have

18:21

what we'd call an M3,

18:22

which is the targets now that we're aiming to deliver to the customer. So, it's

18:25

basically

18:25

like we position value. This is where we've done it before. This is us selling

18:28

value. This is how

18:29

we'll do it for you. So, it's personalized metrics. And then once we actually

18:32

win the customer,

18:33

this is how we'll deliver value as well. And the beauty of this, of course, as

18:38

you probably have

18:39

figured out is an M1 turns an M2, an M2 turns an M3. And then if you deliver

18:42

that value, it goes

18:43

back in the top of the funnel for the rest of the go-to-market team to use for

18:46

new prospective

18:46

customers. You actually have a flywheel effect. All right, last two minutes,

18:52

Medic for the channel.

18:53

So, I said right at the start, we don't use P for partners. It could be quick

18:56

on this bit. The

18:57

idea here is you don't need to have a P for partners, because if you're

18:59

thinking about partners in

19:00

isolation of a letter, not in the overall view of value stakeholders and

19:04

process, then you're

19:06

missing a trick. The idea is that if I'm selling, if I'm co-selling, then I can

19:11

use MedPIC to inform

19:12

my partner of exactly what value I can bring to them. So, I can say to them,

19:18

you know, this is the,

19:19

if we're wanting to co-sell a customer, I can say, this is the pain we solve,

19:23

this is the value

19:24

they get from solving it. Here's how our solution does it. Here's why we're

19:27

better than the incumbent

19:28

or the competition. Here's who we normally engage with. Here's also who needs

19:31

to be involved from

19:32

an economic bar perspective. This is how the process normally looks. This is

19:36

how we engage in the

19:38

cloud marketplace. The last point here, I'll say, before I wrap it up, I'll

19:43

just keep it in time,

19:44

is it's not just about co-selling, but also selling two partners. And what I

19:48

mean in this is we can

19:49

use MedPIC to go to our partners and show them why they should work with us

19:54

over maybe another

19:55

vendor that they may be considering working for that prospect. And I'll just

19:58

load this one up in

19:58

case someone wants to excrete it, because I am out of time and I don't want to

20:01

disrespect

20:02

the next speaker at all. So I thank you very, very much for your time. And yeah

20:07

, I'll happily

20:09

pass it to the next person. Thank you very much for your time. And if you want

20:12

to connect,

20:13

why me on LinkedIn.

20:14

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20:24

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